Moving to Condition Based Maintenance

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As outlined in the April issue of Plant Engineering, “in the beginning there was preventative maintenance (PM). And PMs were good. Every week, month or year, a task was put into place that would improve the longevity of the machine, reduce the likelihood of a failure, and result in fewer money-grabbing breakdowns. Sounds great, right? But those regular, scheduled PMs come with a price tag of their own. Each time a task is performed, such as a filter changed, a pump or motor overhauled, or bearings lubricated, money is spent on replacement components, man hours, and often done during the available production time to perform the actions.

Predictive maintenance, (PdM) is a step up on the maintenance pyramid from preventive maintenance toward improved efficiency. Within the PdM strategy is the practice of condition-based maintenance (CBM). The concept here is to look, listen and feel the machines to know what needs to have service work and when. By doing so you will keep your finger on the pulse of the equipment and allow the maintenance staff to make sound judgments on when and what needs to be done.”

It goes on to say in the article Preventative Maintenance vs. Predictive Maintenance, “Condition monitoring, also known as predictive maintenance (PdM), is the application of condition-based monitoring technologies, statistical process control or equipment performance for the purpose of early detection and elimination of equipment defects that could lead to unplanned downtime or unnecessary expenditures. And generally speaking, you must conduct this while the equipment is in normal operation, with little to no process interruption. The purpose of these tools (vibration analysis, infrared thermography, motor circuit analysis, etc.) is to find defects not possibly found through previously available inspections methods, specifically while the machine is in normal operation.

Taking advantage of the available technology lets you accurately assess the condition of parts and the presence of defects heretofore impossible to detect. An example of the advantage these tools have in the area of quantitative inspections or sensory inspections is the use of vibration analysis to determine the presence of a defect on a rolling element bearing. Previously, mechanics and millwrights relied on “lift checks” to determine the amount of clearance in a bearing.

Unfortunately, this technique is only valid for bearing defects that resulted in the removal of material from the raceways of the bearing; this bearing would be pretty bad off to have thousandths of inches of play in it. Sub-surface fatigue is easily seen with vibration analysis and at this point in the failure propagation has resulted in no removal of material from the raceways. This is the most common example of the advantages of condition-monitoring technologies.

A failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) can help you determine which inspection techniques should be applied, how often and with what degree of redundancy. Remember, the trick is to balance risk with rigor. How much risk you are willing to take with a given failure mode coupled with how much you are willing to pay for the inspection determines the appropriate strategy.”

Top OSHA Violations: Electrical – General Requirements

featuredImageWide_OSHAelectricalEach month, ISHN Magazine highlights one of the 12 most frequently cited OSHA standards for fiscal year 2013.   One of the most cited is the standard for electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general industry 1910.303. Violations of this standard can lead to fatalities, burns and disabling injuries, and ultimately also led to $3, 479, 620 of total penalties proposed by OSHA for violations of this standard (October 2012 through September 2013).

This article covers information including:

  • Most penalized industries
  • Generator Safety
  • Electrical Incidents
  • Power line safety
  • Citations and inspections
  • OSHA’s announcement of the final rule revising standards for electric power generation, transmission and distribution

Click here to read the full article…

New Training Location – Peterson University, San Leandro, CA

image-3186.jpgANNOUNCING A NEW OAKLAND AREA TRAINING LOCATION: PETERSON UNIVERSITY, SAN LEANDRO, CA

AVO Training and Peterson CAT®, one of Caterpillar’s® flagship Dealers, announced that they will partner to offer training courses at Peterson University’s state-of-the-art training facility located in San Leandro, CA. Courses are already underway and will continue throughout the entire year. These courses will feature both electrical safety and electrical maintenance oriented subject matter.

For more information about the courses being offered, to see a full schedule or to register, click here.

Important OSHA Standard 1910.269 Update

OSHA Standard 1910. 269 Final Rule Issued April 1

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced the Final Rule on April 1, 2014 for its Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution and its Electrical Protective Equipment regulations, further improving safety protection for America’s workers. The updated regulations harmonize the general industry and construction requirements so that the same rules apply generally to the same kinds of work. In addition, OSHA based its revisions on the latest consensus standards, specifically, NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace and ANSI/IEEE C2 National Electrical Safety Code, and improvements in electrical safety technology. The Federal Register is scheduled for publication on April 11, 2014. The effective date of these revised regulations is 90 days following publication of the Final Rule.

The Final Rule will provide significant requirements in the following areas:

  • General Training
  • Host Employers and Contractors
  • Minimum Approach Distances and Insulation
  • Protection from Flames and Electric Arc Hazards
  • Deenergizing Transmission and Distribution Lines and Equipment
  • Protective Grounding

Get details on the new requirementsclick here to visit our OSHA Standard 1910.269 Update Page

Facts and Stats in the NEW AVO Training E-book

image-2579.jpgAVO Training is proud to present our new Interactive eBook!

In our continuous efforts to keep people safe from the dangers of electricity, we have developed an interactive e-book that allow you the user to review important information, including:

  • Electrical safety information
  • Statistics
  • Links to our Electrical Safety Self-Assessment Tests (find out how much you really know)
  • AVO Course details and much more!

Click on the image below to view the E-Book now!

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AVO Training Online – Coming April 2014

image-2656.jpgAVO Training Institute is proud to announce the addition of online training to our course offerings.

AVO Training Online offers the convenience of self-paced learning while giving you the electrical safety expertise that you have come to expect from AVO Training Institute, including:

  • Self-paced courses – allows you to stop when you need to, and start back up where you left off.
  • AVO quality instruction – the content of our online courses has been developed by our subject matter experts and contains the same high-quality information that is taught in our instructor-led classes.
  • No travel, lower costs – online instruction allows for training where you are, no flights or hotel costs means money and time saved. 

“Arc Flash Electrical Safety”

Our first product available online in April will be “Arc Flash Electrical Safety”.

This course is comprised of 9 modules, which can be purchased as a bundle or individually and taken on your timetable.  Once you complete the course you will receive a certificate of completion.  This course teaches awareness of the Arc Flash Hazard and the related safety requirements from OSHA and NFPA 70E.

Arc Flash Electrical Safety leads directly into the AVO 2-Day NFPA 70E Instructor-led course!

For more information about our online training, or about other courses offered by AVO Training, contact us a 877-959-7996, or at info@avotraining.com.

Identifying Pitfalls in the Arc Flash Calculation Process

image-2648.jpg“Identifying Pitfalls in the Arc Flash Calculation Process”
by D. Edwin Sherry, P.E.
Electrical Construction and Maintenance Magazine

This article presented in EC&M Magazine explores the arc flash calculations process and understanding the limitations of these methodologies that may put you or your technicians at risk.   It also outlines ways to mitigate these limitations, and mitigate the dangers of an arc flash.

“An electrical arc flash can occur when someone is verifying the presence of voltage, checking the balance of current, operating a switch, inspecting an energized cable or bus connections during routine maintenance, or simply standing in the vicinity of energized equipment. This is a reason to perform an arc flash hazard assessment study — to discern the degree of arc flash hazard present and the level of PPE required at a given location on the power distribution system. In addition, this type of study helps determine the possible means to reduce the energy through time….”

Click here to read the full article.